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Don’t use antibiotics for low-grade fever, ICMR tells doctors

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The Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) has advised doctors to avoid using antibiotics in cases of patients with low-grade fever and viral bronchitis among others.

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In its guidelines released on Saturday, the national health research agency has also advised doctors to follow a timeline while prescribing antibiotics.

The ICMR guidelines suggest that antibiotics should be prescribed for five days in case of community-acquired pneumonia and eight days for hospital-acquired pneumonia. For skin and soft tissue infections, it suggests a duration of five days of antibiotic therapy.

“A stop date should be planned and recorded in advance to ensure antibiotics are not given beyond the recommended duration,” according to the guidelines which aim to promote rational use of antibiotics.

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A survey carried out by the ICMR recently to gauge the trend in antibiotic resistance across the country showed Acinetobacter baumannii, a gram-negative bacteria known to cause infection in the blood, urinary tract and lungs among others, was resistant to high-end antibiotics.

Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) occurs when bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites change over time and no longer respond to medicines, making infections more difficult to treat and increasing the risk of severe illness and death.

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Screening could prevent sudden cardiac death in young people: Doctors’ body

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In the wake of spate of sudden cardiac deaths in Kashmir valley, Doctors Association Kashmir (DAK) on Tuesday called for screening of young people for conditions that can lead to sudden cardiac arrest or death.

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“Screening could prevent sudden cardiac death in young people,” said DAK President Dr Nisar ul Hassan.

“Several of the diseases that cause sudden death in young can be detected by cardiac screening and treated before they turn into a tragedy,” he said.

Dr Hassan said hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a major cause of sudden cardiac death in young. Usually inherited and often undiagnosed, HCM is a condition in which heart muscles become thickened without obvious cause. It affects one in 500 people in the general population.

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“Picking up this condition early and placing an implantable cardioverter device (ICD) can prevent young individuals from dying,” he said.

The DAK President said according to a Swedish study nine in ten cases of sudden death due to HCM in young people were preceded by symptoms, ECG abnormalities or family history.

“These findings suggest that cardiac screening may help prevent sudden death in young population with HCM,” he said.

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Dr Nisar said sudden cardiac arrest in young can also be caused by a long QT syndrome, a genetic heart rhythm condition that causes fast and chaotic heart rhythm in a structurally normal heart. A simple ECG screening can detect this condition and an ICD will help reduce the risk of death in these individuals.

 He said sudden cardiac arrest is the abrupt or unexpected loss of heart function leading to loss of consciousness and collapse. The condition usually results from a problem with your heart’s electrical system. 

Sudden cardiac arrest isn’t same as a heart attack, when blood flow to a part of the heart is blocked. However, a heart attack can sometimes trigger an electrical disturbance that leads to sudden cardiac arrest.

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“If not treated immediately, sudden cardiac arrest leads to death.  Chances of survival outside a hospital increase in those who receive immediate bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR),” he added.

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In six years, SKIMS registers 27,727 cancer cases, records 1833 deaths

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In six year, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS) Soura have registered over 27,000 patients ailing with cancer disease.

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Besides, the institute has witnessed 1833 deaths due to different types of cancer.

During this period, the institute has also issued 64,504 Out Patient Department (OPD) cards issued by the department of Nephrology.

The official figures of SKIMS accessed by the news agency—Kashmir News Observer (KNO) reveals that from October-2016 to October-2022, the institute has registered 27,727.

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The Public Information Officer (PIO) SKIMS in a reply to Right to Information (RTI) said, “Total number of OPD cards issued under the Nephrology Department from October-2016 to October-2022 are 64504 and cancer patients registered are 27727.”

“From October-2016 to October-2022, a total number of 17,579 deaths have been registered,” PIO said.

It also said that under medical Oncology, radiotherapy, Clinical Hematology and Surgical Oncology during these six years are 1833 while under the Nephrology department at least 1145 deaths were recorded.

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The PIO also said that 1745 accidental deaths were also recorded by the institute during this period.

About the total number of patients admitted and treated in State Cancer Institute since its establishment from December-05-2020 to October-2022 includes, the officer said that at least 2473 patients were admitted and treated while 659 deaths were also recorded.

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On asking about the proposal submitted to the government for a separate kidney hospital, the PIO said, “Any kind of proposal for a separate kidney hospital will be dealt with by the administration.”

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Man thrombolysed at SDH Beerwah

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A 45 year male was today thrombolysed in ER room at SDH Beerwah after diagnosed inferior wall MI with ST elevation through ECG advised by doctors on duty.

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The patient reported SDH Beerwah today at 3.45 am with chest pain and restlessness.

After thrombolysis, the patient got stabilized and pain was relieved. It is worth mentioning that ‘door to needle’ time was only 16 minutes and a young life was saved due to prompt intervention of staff on duty. Patient was later referred to tertiary care in a stabilized condition.

The team members were Jan Mohamad, Bashir Ahmad, Masooda Akther headed by Dr Irfan (Physician). BMO Beerwah Dr Javaid appreciated the role of the team and reiterated the commitment to render services at door steps. He further said that such interventions at the periphery have dramatically changed the health scenario and has helped in saving lives.

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